Graffiti Doors

I have three images of graffiti doors to contribute to Norm’s Thursday Doors challenge this week.

The first image – Melbourne Jan 2014 – is a good example of “high” street art. Melbourne, Australia is a great location for scouting graffiti as an art form in various laneways. The graphic quality; the bright, neon colours; and the sophistication of this composition all contribute to the pleasure of the visual experience. The image is dated January, 2014, as graffiti in its nature is temporal, and this door may be completely different today.

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Melbourne Jan 2014

Message delivered is at the opposite end of the graffiti spectrum. Hard to discern any form of art on this Toronto garage door – just a written message. It seemed to be effective though – there were no cars parked in front of the door.

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message delivered

Blues and greens lies somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. Someone has painted this facade with some swirling blues and greens, and a few tags have been applied in response. Definitely on the grungy side.

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blues and greens

 

Thursday’s Special – Traces of the Past Y3-10

This is my second “Traces of the Past” post in response to Paula’s Lost in Translation challenge for this week.

This week’s special is a photo challenge in colour (my previous submission for Traces of the Past was in black and white). I have been experimenting with combining colour and monochrome in a single image, so I thought that this would be a good opportunity to post an image and request some feedback.

Holy Island (also known as Lindisfarne) is an historic site, located in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It’s historic significance dates back to Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times, and there are two prominent ruins on the island – Lindisfarne Castle and Lindisfarne Priory.

My image of Lindisfarne Castle – viewed from a bay near the priory ruins – uses colour to depict the present, and monochrome to depict the past. The colour portion is rectangular, and provides a window into the present from the past. There is also the juxtaposition of an old boat in the foreground with some newer boats in the harbour. Please let me know what you think about the presentation.

We are planning to return to Holy Island next summer to participate in an archaeological dig near the priory. More opportunities for some historical images and a chance to get my hands dirty while searching for more traces of the past …

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Lindisfarne Castle, Northumbria, England

Doors Open at 6:30 pm …

This past Monday, November 6, 2017, I had the privilege to attend the Tower of Song: A Memorial Trubute to Leonard Cohen. The doors to the Bell Centre, downtown Montreal, opened shortly after 6:30 pm, and the rest, as they say, was history.

The tribute was organized by Adam Cohen, his family and friends, to celebrate the life of Adam’s father, Leonard Cohen. The late Leonard Cohen passed away a year ago, on November 7, 2016. He was born and raised in Montreal, and became a well known poet, song writer and musician.

The overall experience was magical and overwhelming, listening to more than 20 renditions of Leonard Cohen’s music by various artists, who volunteered their time to participate. My most favourite songs of all were k.d. lang’s rendition of “Hallelujah,” and “Famous Blue Raincoat” by Damien Rice. My partner and I had seen Leonard Cohen and Damien Rice in a concert together in Dublin in 2008, and this brought back many fond memories of that overseas trip.

Also worth mentioning were performances by Sharon Robinson, who sang “I’m Your Man,” and provided background vocals with the Webb sisters for much of the concert; Patrick Watson, a local singer who I had not been aware of; and theĀ Shaar Hashomayim Synagogue Choir, who performed the background vocals for “You Want it Darker.”

Leonard Cohen penned many poems and song lyrics, so I will leave the last words to Leonard (and his co-writer):

I’ll try to say a little more:
Love went on and on
Until it reached an open door –
Then Love Itself
Love Itself was gone.”

chorus to “Love Itself,” written by Sharon Robinson and Leonard Cohen

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tower of song