Bicycle Collection – Part 2

For many cyclists who have owned a bicycle for a long time, it is difficult to give up on the old, trusty machine when it has truly passed its functional life cycle. How can you recycle a bicycle?

Some tips are provided on the internet. One pessimistic suggestion is to just leave the bicycle unlocked on the street, and it will soon disappear and become someone else’s solution – or problem. Some bikes can be dismantled, and the components reused on another bike, or crafted into some unique decoration.

The following images illustrate other approaches to repurposing old bicycles. Some have been strung up on a wall and used as signposts. Others have been sprayed with neon paint to attract the attention of a passer-by – it is intersting to note that these bicycles have still been secured to their final resting place with a lock and chain, regardless of their lack of functionality.

bicycle don montolio cw
ET went home
bicycle albergue cw
a place to retire
orange bicycle-railing cw
rail bike?
pink bicycle-brow bar cw
diamonds in the rough

Bicycle Collection – Part 1

It has been a few weeks since I last posted on my blog. I thought that I would start a new “thread” of posts based on one of my favourite topics – bicycles.

Cycling was one of my favourite recreational pastimes throughout much of my life. Cycling to school, cycling to work, bicycle touring on the weekend and bicycle touring on vacation. It all came to an abrupt end, after being hit by a car door, but that’s another story.

During my travels, I have always looked out for bicycle photo ops. The following images are the beginnings of my nostalgic look at old bicycles and how they are or have been used. I hope that you find some enjoyment in these as well.

bicycle and flower pots cw
bicycle and flower pots
bicycle treats cw
bicycle and treats
bicycle and block wall cw
bicycle leaning on a concrete block wall

Small Buildings – Series 3

I recently visited the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum, located in West Sussex in the UK. Founded in 1967, this independent museum was established to preserve hundreds of years of history of rural and village life.

Many historic buildings from the region have been relocated to the Museum. Two of these are included in this series of images.

The Toll House was moved from Beeding in Sussex. It was originally built in the early 1800’s to control entry to a new turnpike, and tolls were collected for all vehicular and animal traffic. For example, “For every Horse, Mule, Afs. or other Beast laden or unladen and not drawing, the Sum of Two-pence”. Toll roads are not a new thing.

Whittaker’s Cottage #1 was built in Asthead Surrey in the 1860’s. It is furnished with the Museum’s collections as it may have been in the late 19th Century, when the house was occupied by the Filkins family, which included 8 children. Each floor of the 2-storey cottage has two rooms – one heated, and the other not. I wonder how the heated bedrooms were allocated?

Stay tuned for a post on the people of the Weald & Downland.

toll house 12x16
Toll House from Beeding, Sussex
whittakers cottage 16x16
Whittaker’s Cottage #1

Walking in the Cotswolds

In 2013 we walked the Cotswold Way, from Chipping Campden to Bath, in the west of England. The Cotswolds are a very picturesque part of the country, where you can walk on trails and paths and find your own way that does not involve cars and roads.

A selection of three images from our walk are included here.

The Chipping Campden Market Square was built almost 400 years ago. Although this is a black and white image of the square, it is built in the typical honey-coloured stone that was quarried in this part of the country.

Hailes Abbey is on the route from Broadway to Winchcombe. The ruins were once a Cistercian monastery, and they are now managed by English Heritage.

Wesley House is located nearby in Winchcombe. It is a traditional heavy timber wood framed building which has been preserved and operates as a hotel and restaurant. We stayed for a night in the hotel, and I always had to watch my head on the low beams and doorways!

market square
Chipping Campden Market Square
cloister view
Cloister View, Hailes Abbey
wesley house
Wesley House, Winchcombe

 

Small Buildings – Series 2

These three buildings are closer to home – they are all located in Canada.

Customs House is an historic building prominently located on Wharf Street in downtown Victoria. It was built in the 1870’s – which is very old for anywhere in Western Canada. The pink exterior blends in nicely with the pink cherry blossoms when they arrive in the spring.

The lighthouse from Prince Edward Island is one of many similar structures located on the island. I love the serenity of this image.

The waterfront industrial building is located on the north shore of Burrard Inlet in North Vancouver. It represents a waning marine and logging industry in a growing metropolitan area. Eventually to become another waterfront condominium development?

custom house 12x16
Customs House, Victoria, BC
North Rustico lighthouse 16x16
North Rustico Lighthouse, PEI
industrial waterfront 16x16
Industrial waterfront, North Vancouver, BC

Small Buildings – Series 1

Each of these buildings has its own individual personalty.

The Barclay and Company Building is shaped like a cube, located on a corner lot, with a single arched opening on the two street facades. I love the juxtaposition of the sole red garbage container, basking in the morning sun.

L’Auberge Ravoux is best known as the last home of Vincent van Gogh. Room 5 in the attic was his final abode. This building is also known as the House of van Gogh.

The farm house in the mist is located near Tarn Hows, which is a short walk from Hawkshead, Cumbia. The image is processed with a soft and hazy filter to help express the mood.

Barclay and Co 16x16
Barclay and Company, Penzance, Cornwall
Auberge ravoux 16x16
L’Auberge Ravoux, Auvers-sur-Oise, France
farmhouse in the mist 16x16
Farmhouse in the mist, Tarn Hows, Cumbria