Shafts of Sunlight

Autumn is upon us, and as the sun sinks lower in the sky, every sunny day becomes more appreciated. The streets of downtown Toronto can get dark as you walk among the office towers, but there are locations where the sun still shines.

It has taken me some time to find a new theme for a post. Last week, I journeyed into the downtown core in search of shafts of sunlight. They are even more appealing today as we are greeted by a wet and soggy morning.

walkway shadows

Most of the time I found lots of people also out enjoying the sunshine as they adventured into the day.

three amigos
sunshine plaza

The high contrast subject matter was best exhibited in a monochrome interpretation. The hard edges of the shadows created by the architectural elements were softened by the human content.

business day
tuned in
good morning sunshine
mottled sunshine
exit stairs

Beneath the Columns

I have been waiting for an opportunity to post a couple of images that include people and columns. Columns are obviously an essential element in the design of structures. In classical and neo-classical architecture, decorative columns were used to identify the main entry to a building, which was usually raised above street level, requiring steps to reach the entrance. The steps and the spaces beneath and between the columns have become places for people, who are often dwarfed by the scale and immensity of the columns. These are great places for people to gather and people-watch.

Today’s post was inspired by the Photo for the Week Photography Challenge, posted by RyanPhotography, on the topic of columns.

people watching cw
people watching 1

people sitting cw
people watching 2

 

Thursday’s Special – Wintry

This morning I caught a view of some snow flurries in action. I think that I was able to capture a wintry mood in the image that I am posting today in response to Paula’s latest Lost in Translation Thursday’s Special. Adding some extra grain to the snowflakes makes my vision even more wintry.

LiT-wintry cw
wintry morning

A Visit to Crawford Lake

I recently visited Crawford Lake, located NW of Toronto, near the City of Milton. Crawford Lake is a conservation area that is managed by Conservation Halton, which is a regional land use administrative authority.

Although Crawford Lake Park is named after a farming family that settled by the lake, the park is known for the reconstructed Indigenous longhouses located on the site. The original inhabitants of this site were Nations of the Iroqoian linguistic group, who occupied a village on the site from around the 13th to the 17th centuries.

Three of the longhouses have been reconstructed and are used as presentation spaces and to display artifacts found during archaeological investigations at the site.

The images presented focus on the wooden structure of the longhouse. They are also being posted in conjunction with this week’s theme of Black & White Sunday: Structure on Paula’s Lost in Translation blog.

The basic structure consists of tree trunks that are buried in the earth, and connected at the top with flexible poles. The cladding consists of bark from trees. I am unsure of the materials used to construct the roof membrane.

crawford lake longhouse 1 cw
turtle house entrance

crawford lake longhouse 2 cw
turtle house elevation

crawford lake longhouse 3 cw
lattice structure

crawford lake longhouse 4 cw
silhouette

Monochrome Arches – Series 4

This series continues with a few more favourite images of passageways and doors.

Old churches in England are great places to search for arches and vaults. Salisbury Cathedral has the largest cloister among all of the churches in England. A cloister is a covered walkway that surrounds an outdoor quadrangle. Salisbury Cathedral also houses one of the original copies of the Magna Carta.

The underground vaults are from Canterbury Cathedral, which is the centre of the Church of England. Canterbury Cathedral is a popular pilgrimage destination for tourists visiting the shrine of Thomas Becket, the archbishop who was murdered in the cathedral in 1170.

The other images are taken during walks in France and Spain. The passageways lead the viewer on to explore the world on the other side of the opened doors.

salisbury cathedral
Cloister walk, Salisbury Cathedral, England

underground vaults
underground vaults, Canterbury Cathedral, England

the straight pathway
the garden path

the passageway
the passageway