Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge: Shape

Sometimes a photo challenge topic comes along and you know right away: I have a good example for that.

Here is my submission this week for Paula’s Lost in Translation Black & White Challenge: Shape.

My “shape” is a unique light fixture found in a downtown office building in Toronto. I titled it light spill because it looks like something that spilled on the floor – except this is looking up, not down.

LiT-shape-light spill cw
light spill

Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Ceiling

Some blogging photo challenges inspire me more than others. This month I found some inspiration in Paula’s Lost in Translation Black & White Challenge: Ceiling.

Two images from London, England, immediately came to my mind as worthy of posting on my blog. Both ceilings are examples of functional architecture, bringing daylight into a central and otherwise enclosed space.

Covent Garden Market was opened in 1830, and was designed to enclose an outdoor market that had been on the site since the late 17th Century. This photograph was taken in December – hence the Christmas decorations hanging under the skylight.

The Tate Modern Gallery is housed in a repurposed power plant on the south bank of the Thames. The Bankside Power Station was rebuilt after WWII as an oil-fired electricity generating plant, and this skylight was originally located over the turbine room, which is now the main entrance hall to the Tate.

LiT-ceiling-Covent Garden cw
Covent Garden Market
LiT-ceiling-Tate Modern cw
Tate Modern Gallery

A Visit to Crawford Lake

I recently visited Crawford Lake, located NW of Toronto, near the City of Milton. Crawford Lake is a conservation area that is managed by Conservation Halton, which is a regional land use administrative authority.

Although Crawford Lake Park is named after a farming family that settled by the lake, the park is known for the reconstructed Indigenous longhouses located on the site. The original inhabitants of this site were Nations of the Iroqoian linguistic group, who occupied a village on the site from around the 13th to the 17th centuries.

Three of the longhouses have been reconstructed and are used as presentation spaces and to display artifacts found during archaeological investigations at the site.

The images presented focus on the wooden structure of the longhouse. They are also being posted in conjunction with this week’s theme of Black & White Sunday: Structure on Paula’s Lost in Translation blog.

The basic structure consists of tree trunks that are buried in the earth, and connected at the top with flexible poles. The cladding consists of bark from trees. I am unsure of the materials used to construct the roof membrane.

crawford lake longhouse 1 cw
turtle house entrance
crawford lake longhouse 2 cw
turtle house elevation
crawford lake longhouse 3 cw
lattice structure
crawford lake longhouse 4 cw
silhouette

Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Typical

On two occasions over the past decade, I have visited the Louvre Museum in Paris. On both of my visits, I viewed The Mona Lisa painting by Leonardo da Vinci. This is my first example of the use of this week’s theme word – I am certain that an infrequent visitor to the Louvre, like me, will “typically” view this iconic painting during a tour of the museum.

I took a photograph during each visit, and both images display a “typical” crowd of viewers crowded around the painting. Cameras and mobiles ready to shoot.

Perhaps “atypically,” there is one person in each image who is pointing a camera or phone in the opposite direction. The 2016 version is likely for a selfie, but not the earlier version.

These images have been posted in response to Paula’s Lost in Translation challenge for this week – Typical.

LiT-mona lisa october 2010 cw
Mona Lisa, October 2010
LiT-mona lisa april 2016 cw
Mona Lisa, April 2016

Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Traces of the Past

This is my second contribution to the Lost in Translation blog Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge. This week’s topic is “Traces of the Past Y2-06,” which instantly reminded me of images I have taken of ancient standing stone monuments in my travels in the UK. I enjoy visiting sites like these because they stimulate your imagination, and make you wonder how these structures were used when they were first built.

The portal into the past is probably the most recognizable image, as Stonehenge is a popular tourist destination, located in Wiltshire in southern England. It is a neolithic standing stone circle that is several 1000’s of years old.

LiT-portal into the past cw
portal into the past

Lanyon Quoit is much lesser known. Located in Cornwall, south-west England, this stone structure was once part of a dolmen, or ancient tomb. The stones that remain are a reconstruction of the original tomb, with many missing parts.

LiT-lanyon quoit cw
Lanyon Quoit

Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Windows

This is my first time entering an image in the Lost in Translation Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge. This week’s challenge is the topic of windows, with some selective colouring.

My choice of widows is a shot that I took for its minimalist qualities. It is a single storey commercial building with black ribbed metal siding, and a window that was quite literally punched into the facade. The monochrome effect was almost there already, with the exception of a small green vase in one corner of the window.

window with green vase cw
window with green vase