Doors of southern France – Part 2

This is the second half of my collection of doors from southern France, and this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

We begin with another door from Narbonne – this one more institutional than the doors included in Part 1. Someone has gone to a lot of work to preserve the finish on these two wood doors. The two gargoyles are also quite well preserved.

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Office door in Narbonne

The glazed door is from a hotel in Avignon. The glazing and the opened door make this entrance much more inviting than any of the other doors – but then, for a hotel to be successful, this is a good feature to have.

Avignon is well known as the site of the Pont d’Avignon, located on the Rhone River. Several popes resided in Avignon in the 14th Century, and parts of the city are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, making it a popular tourist attraction.

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Hotel door in Avignon

The third door is from Les Baux-de-Provence, another historic village in southern France. Baux is a hilltop village that has been inhabited for thousands of years. There are typically more tourists than villagers in town on most days.

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Old door in Les Baux-de-Provence

The largest set of doors in my French collection belong to the Church of Saint-Trophime in Arles. The church is well known as a good example of Romanesque architecture – note the round arch above the doors – as are the sculptures on the portal.

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Church of Saint-Trophime, Arles

Monochrome Arches – Series 3

It is now time to update my collection of Monochrome Arches with some more recent images shot this year. The first two images are post-Industrial Revolution structures from the latter half of the 1800’s. Built of wrought iron, they are impressive in their scale and engineering. These super-sized frames are way beyond the human scale, but they have other admirable qualities – a vantage point from which to view the world and a shelter from the elements.

Then third image is another addition to my collection of churches. St. James Church is framed by the gated entrance.

All of my images in the Monochrome Arches series are also framed with a white matte – a frame outside of the frame. They are sized to be mounted on a 12×16 inch or 16 square inch board.

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Eiffel Tower, Paris, France
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St. Pancras Station, London, England
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St. James Church, Avebury, England

 

Double Exposures

The following three images are examples of double exposures where I have combined two photos to create one image. They are all taken at various locations in England.

Marble Arch in the centre of London is a popular place for families to gather. Pigeons are always found everywhere in London. Combine a child with pigeons and you get some great action shots.

Lindisfarne Priory was our final stop when we walked the St. Cuthbert’s Way in the north-east of England. St. Cuthbert was responsible for spreading Christianity throughout the region in the 7th Century.  St. Cuthbert lived for several years on Holy Island, before he retired to his hermitage on Inner Farne Island. In this image, a modern sculpture of St. Cuthbert is blended with the remains of the priory, which was built several centuries after his death.

Grasmere is a beautiful spot in the Lake District, at any time of the year. The daffodils are out in full bloom in the spring, making for a colourful collage.

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chasing pigeons at Marble Arch
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St. Cuthbert at Lindisfarne Priory
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Grasmere church at springtime

 

Darker Tones

I have recently been experimenting with darker tones in black and white photographs. Using images that were shot in broad daylight, I have been processing them with masks and gradients to darken parts of the image. These three images are examples from this processing.

The Rock of Cashel is a popular tourist attraction in Ireland. The proximity of gravestones and the cloudy sky add to the sinister and moody look of the image.

The RC Harris Water Treatment Plant is located in the Beaches area of east Toronto. It is a majestic art deco building that looks much more impressive than its purpose – to process domestic drinking water from nearby Lake Ontario. Water purification is a basic human need, so, perhaps, the “darker” treatment is not in keeping with its altruistic public health goals.

The exterior fire escape is attached to an office building in Victoria. External fire escapes are much more prevalent in other cities, but this is a good example of a simple geometric facade with the fire escape and its shadow dominating one end of the building. Applying a gradient adds some interest to an otherwise monochromatic wall.

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The Rock of Cashel
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water treatment plant
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fire escape