Doors with a Nautical Theme

My contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors this week is doors with a nautical theme. The door with a porthole is similar to one I included in an earlier post, but it comes from a coastal port in Cornwall, instead of Ireland. Maybe, over time, the porthole got miniaturized to become the peephole that is now a common feature in doors?

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The Seawitch, Penzance, Cornwall
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Mermaid Cottage, Kinsale, Ireland

Doors of southern France – Part 2

This is the second half of my collection of doors from southern France, and this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors.

We begin with another door from Narbonne – this one more institutional than the doors included in Part 1. Someone has gone to a lot of work to preserve the finish on these two wood doors. The two gargoyles are also quite well preserved.

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Office door in Narbonne

The glazed door is from a hotel in Avignon. The glazing and the opened door make this entrance much more inviting than any of the other doors – but then, for a hotel to be successful, this is a good feature to have.

Avignon is well known as the site of the Pont d’Avignon, located on the Rhone River. Several popes resided in Avignon in the 14th Century, and parts of the city are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, making it a popular tourist attraction.

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Hotel door in Avignon

The third door is from Les Baux-de-Provence, another historic village in southern France. Baux is a hilltop village that has been inhabited for thousands of years. There are typically more tourists than villagers in town on most days.

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Old door in Les Baux-de-Provence

The largest set of doors in my French collection belong to the Church of Saint-Trophime in Arles. The church is well known as a good example of Romanesque architecture – note the round arch above the doors – as are the sculptures on the portal.

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Church of Saint-Trophime, Arles

Doors of northern Spain

The images in this series were collected on a walk on the Camino de Santiago in northern Spain. They were taken at various locations between Roncesvalles and Santiago de Compostela.

The scallop shell motif is one of the waymarkers that is used along the Camino. The scallop shell is said to be a metaphor, representing the routes starting at various locations throughout Europe and leading pilgrims to Santiago de Compostela, where the tomb of St. James is located.

In the first image, I found the shell appeared above the doorway and as a decorative item on the actual door.

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Door to No. 49
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Old door and windows with shutters
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Door to No. 4

Doors of southern France – Part 1

This is the second instalment of my posts dedicated to doors and this week’s contribution to Thursday Doors. This week I have selected two doors from southern France.

These two doors are located in the city of Narbonne, which is located in the former region of Languedoc (now Occitanie) in south-west France. Narbonne is an ancient city, established in the second Century, and located on a major Roman road that connected Italy with Spain. The city became a regional capital, and it reached its zenith in the 12th and 13th centuries, after which it declined in importance.

Both doors are very Medieval in appearance, and one can imagine that they looked the same hundreds of years ago. The diamond motifs and the use of studs are two characteristics of Medieval-style doors.

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Blue door – Narbonne
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White door – Narbonne

Doors of the UK and Ireland – Part 1

From a young age I have always been interested in topical collections. My first memories from childhood include collecting matchbook covers and swizzle sticks. My matchbook covers were usually collected on the streets near home. Swizzle sticks often came from further afield, including vacations with my parents, when we would be served drinks with a swizzle stick for stirring – usually just a Coke for me!

Later on, I started to collect stamps with a common theme. My choice was to collect stamps from around the world that pictured airplanes, which evolved to include rockets and satellites once we entered the space age.

In photography, my first topical collection was based on circles, and I printed many black and white images of circles, which I mounted onto cardstock. Those prints are long gone now. More recently, I have been collecting digital images of front doors during my travels.

Doors can vary in design, size and colour depending where you are in the world. I have included a few images of residential doors that I have discovered and enjoyed in England and Ireland.

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Blue door with porthole – Ireland
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Red door – Cornwall
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Blue door and gate – Ireland