Doors of the UK – Part 3

I have been diving deep into my archives to find a few more doors to post to share with the followers of Norm’s Thursday Doors. I managed to find some “old” doors from previous walking tours of the UK.

All of these doors were found in farms in various locations in England – Cumbria, Yorkshire and the Cotswolds. It is amazing how resilient the old wooden doors seem to be.

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arch with double doors
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arch with single door
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old tithe barn door

Thursday’s Special – Darkness and Light

There is no more iconic location to celebrate the winter solstice than at Stonehenge in southern England. This is my contribution to Paula’s Lost in Translation Thursday’s Special for the week of December 21, 2017.

Although this photo was not shot in December, it was taken at sunrise. The special effects were mostly accidental – while experimenting with a variable ND filter – which resulted in the red flaring. The blue hue was accentuated using a DXO filter preset. The overall impression – mysterious.

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Darkness and light at sunrise

Thursday’s Special – Traces of the Past Y3-10

This is my second “Traces of the Past” post in response to Paula’s Lost in Translation challenge for this week.

This week’s special is a photo challenge in colour (my previous submission for Traces of the Past was in black and white). I have been experimenting with combining colour and monochrome in a single image, so I thought that this would be a good opportunity to post an image and request some feedback.

Holy Island (also known as Lindisfarne) is an historic site, located in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It’s historic significance dates back to Anglo-Saxon and Medieval times, and there are two prominent ruins on the island – Lindisfarne Castle and Lindisfarne Priory.

My image of Lindisfarne Castle – viewed from a bay near the priory ruins – uses colour to depict the present, and monochrome to depict the past. The colour portion is rectangular, and provides a window into the present from the past. There is also the juxtaposition of an old boat in the foreground with some newer boats in the harbour. Please let me know what you think about the presentation.

We are planning to return to Holy Island next summer to participate in an archaeological dig near the priory. More opportunities for some historical images and a chance to get my hands dirty while searching for more traces of the past …

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Lindisfarne Castle, Northumbria, England

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Wheels

I selected a couple of images of old wheels to post in response to Cee’s weekly Black and White Photo Challenge for this week. These wheels belong to old carts that were the primary means of transporting commodities in their day. Presently, they are on display for public viewing at museums or antique shops, as a reminder of the past.

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The Cumnock Star wagon was built in the 1870’s and operated on a round trip route between Cumnock and Molong, in central New South Wales, Australia. This wagon was drawn by a team of 9 clydesdales, carrying wheat in one direction, and beer, spirits and supplies in the opposite direction. The Aussies have always needed to be well supplied!

The old cart and wheelbarrows are on display at the Weald and Downland Living Museum, located in southern England, and the subject of one of my previous blog posts.

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The Cumnock Star
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cart and wheelbarrow wheels

Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge – Traces of the Past

This is my second contribution to the Lost in Translation blog Black & White Sunday Photo Challenge. This week’s topic is “Traces of the Past Y2-06,” which instantly reminded me of images I have taken of ancient standing stone monuments in my travels in the UK. I enjoy visiting sites like these because they stimulate your imagination, and make you wonder how these structures were used when they were first built.

The portal into the past is probably the most recognizable image, as Stonehenge is a popular tourist destination, located in Wiltshire in southern England. It is a neolithic standing stone circle that is several 1000’s of years old.

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portal into the past

Lanyon Quoit is much lesser known. Located in Cornwall, south-west England, this stone structure was once part of a dolmen, or ancient tomb. The stones that remain are a reconstruction of the original tomb, with many missing parts.

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Lanyon Quoit

Doors of the UK – Part 2

My original post of three doors from the UK (albeit two were actually from Ireland) was not intended to be serialized as a weekly post. But then Norm from Thursday Doors commented on my doors – and so we have progressed on a new track.

In this week’s post I am revisiting my collection and adding three more doors from the UK.  I have also corrected the title of my earlier post and sub-titled it “Part 1.”

The first two images are of grand Georgian doors from the Royal Crescent in Bath. I came across these doors in mid-December one year, just following the first snow fall of the season. In some parts of the world, we are still seeing some snow, so these doors are still “in season.”

Apparently, door No. 22 has received some notoriety, due to its colour. In the 1970’s, the resident of No. 22 painted her door yellow, while all of the other doors were painted white. The Bath City Council insisted it should be repainted white, the Secretary of State for the Environment intervened, and the door remained yellow. Rebellion in Bath!

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No. 22 The Royal Crescent
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No. 23 The Royal Crescent
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Door No. 10, somewhere in Oxford

The third door image was shot in Oxford, and is probably the earliest vintage door in my digital collection. The longer I study this door, the more I discover its eccentricities. One of the stained glass panels differs from the other two as the grid pattern is smaller. And what happened to 10A?