Discovering Toronto Heritage – by Accident

I recently discovered this preserved building facade during an exploratory walk in downtown Toronto. The Jenkins Antique and Art Galleries signage was created in full Art Nouveau style, and I am sure that this is a rare example of the preservation of this architectural style in Toronto.

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Jenkins Antique and Art Galleries – Now

After further investigation, I have found the following historical facts. This building was incorporated into a high-rise condominium known as The Gallery which was opened in 1990. The architects for this development were Kirkor Archiects and Planners. The original building was designated as a Part IV heritage building in 1984, whicch meant that the sign and facade had to be incorporated into the new structure.

The original gallery was designed by Sproatt & Rolph Architects, who designed many well known buildings in Toronto. It dates back to the early 1900’s when it was the primary importer of antique mahogany and rosewood furniture in Toronto. I found the accompanying archival photo of the original building.

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Jenkins Antique and Art Galleries – Then

Black & White & Red

I enjoy converting some of my photographs into monochrome black and white images. This usually occurs in situations where the colours do not add anything to the overall quality of the image. However, sometimes there are situations where a little added colour can have a great impact.

The following are two examples where I think that a touch of colour has a great effect. In both cases, the colour is red, which is a “hot” button that immediately draws your attention to the main focus point.

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Industrial waterfront, Bilbao, Spain
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“I’m ready, where’s everyone else?”