Garage Doors – Series 2

It has been a couple of weeks since I last posted any images on my blog, so I thought that I would take a moment to reflect on my previous “Door” posts. My first post on doors was in January 2017, when I displayed images of some doors from travels in England and Ireland. Over the ensuing eight months, I posted another 12 sets of door images – making doors my most common theme over the year.

I have received more views and likes of my door images than for any other theme. No doubt, this success was due to my participation in Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors group. Thank you Norm for all of your work, and thank you to all the other door lovers out there.

My earlier door posts featured images from other parts of the world. Having depleted much of my foreign collection of doors, my posts have become more localized, focused closer to home in Toronto. The subject matter has become more mundane, but I am still trying to find something unique in an otherwise ordinary scene.

When I posted my first series of doors from the UK and Ireland, I had not anticipated that they would become part of a series. The same can be said for my more recent post on Garage Doors. But here I am, posting some more garage doors – all located within walking distance from my home.

Here is this week’s contribution to Norm’s Thursday Doors weekly feature.

I am more attracted by the brick rather than the doors in brick garage. The colour and the texture of the bricks, and the fragility of the structure are most notable. The driveway ramp no longer slopes up to the doors, so one wonders what is stored behind these doors now?

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brick garage

In semi-symmetry, the near-perfect symmetry of the two halves of this semi-detached residence drew my attention. The wrought iron handrails and balconies are identical, while the colour of the garage doors provides some individuality to each side. My guess – the purple door is not original.

I always used to refer to these types of residences as duplexes. However, I have since learned that, in a semi-detached home, the two residences are side-by-side and share one common wall. In a duplex, the two residences are one atop the other. They both have separate exterior entrances.

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semi-symmetry

I will admit that the thing that attracted me initially was the green door in infill. It was only later that I recognized that there is an infill panel where a garage door used to be. The garage door has been replaced with a man-door and HVAC equipment – and there is more space for storing the ubiquitous blue wheelies.

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infill

A day out at the Museum

Whenever possible, a trip to London should include a visit to the British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury area.

The Museum is a good place to go to watch people, as well as a place of historical significance. Like most large museums, you need to have a plan and a specific objective to make the visit worthwhile.

Our quest was to view the treasures from Sutton Hoo. We had just been to the Sutton Hoo archaeological site in Suffolk. The site contains several 7th Century burial mounds which were just recently (historically speaking) excavated in the 20th Century. Now a National Trust site, there are not many original artefacts that are on display at Sutton Hoo – you have to visit the British Museum to see the real things.

Like many of the other national museums in the UK, admission to the British Museum is free (donations are gratefully appreciated). The museum relies on a lot of private and corporate donations to keep it operating. You can view the names of some of the most significant donors on the wall of the circular Reading Room in the middle of the courtyard.

The Great Court (the centre of the museum) is covered with a glass roof, creating the largest covered square in Europe.

As many of the artefacts at the British Museum were collected during the heydays of the British Empire, the Museum is not without its controversies. There are several items in the collections that have been claimed by other countries, requesting their return to their place of origin. The Sutton Hoo treasures were locally sourced, so these should remain in the UK.

We did sight two carved totem poles from the Canadian west coast on display in the courtyard. Are they just on loan?

One final technical point for other photographers. I found that the AWB setting on my camera did not adapt well to the covered courtyard. All of my images had a significant green tint. Thank goodness for the white balance adjustment brush in Lightroom!

classical modern
classical modern
here's looking at you, kid
here’s looking at you, kid!
on the move
on the move
premium seating cw
premium seating
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Haida totem pole

More Wallpaper Images

I have been travelling in Europe for the past month, and as a result I have collected some new images to add to my portfolio.

In order to ease back into posting on my blog, I decided to start with a familiar theme – some new images to add to my “wallpaper” album, which is included on my flickr site. I am always on the lookout for walls and facades where I can minimize the perspective and create a two-dimensional image.

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abstract in grey and white
w1-cottage roofline cw
cottage roofline
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daytime parking on Chiddingstone Street

Sun and Shadows

All of the images in this series are of public spaces located inside buildings. Two of these buildings are located in Australia, where the sun is always prevalent. The sun, shining through glazed windows, leaves its imprint on the walls and floors. The structural system of the walls and glazing is revealed through the shadows that are cast by the sun.

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Harbourfront lobby, Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia
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Atrium, Gordon Place Hotel, Melbourne, Australia
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Main entry, University of Toronto Pharmacy Building, Toronto, Ontario

Small Buildings – Series 1

Each of these buildings has its own individual personalty.

The Barclay and Company Building is shaped like a cube, located on a corner lot, with a single arched opening on the two street facades. I love the juxtaposition of the sole red garbage container, basking in the morning sun.

L’Auberge Ravoux is best known as the last home of Vincent van Gogh. Room 5 in the attic was his final abode. This building is also known as the House of van Gogh.

The farm house in the mist is located near Tarn Hows, which is a short walk from Hawkshead, Cumbia. The image is processed with a soft and hazy filter to help express the mood.

Barclay and Co 16x16
Barclay and Company, Penzance, Cornwall
Auberge ravoux 16x16
L’Auberge Ravoux, Auvers-sur-Oise, France
farmhouse in the mist 16x16
Farmhouse in the mist, Tarn Hows, Cumbria

Small Structures

Here are a few examples of small structures that I have photographed and want to issue as a series of prints. Each image is framed in a white border to isolate the subject.

yorkshire-farmhouse-colour-12x16
Yorkshire dales farm structures
yorkshire-dales-colour-12x16-copy
Yorkshire dales barn
park-gates-12x16
closed for the season
lifeguard-station-12x16
the Beaches lifeguard station