Doors of the UK – the NYMR

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway runs across the North Yorkshire Moors between Pickering and Whitby and it is a very popular tourist attraction in North Yorkshire. The railway is a great place to visit for all (former and present) model railway enthusiasts who wish to experience a full-scale version of old train locomotives, carriages and stations.

This railway is owned and operated by the North York Moors Historical Railway Trust, which is a not-for-profit charitable organisation. Daily operation is carried out by a team of paid staff alongside many volunteers with railway operations and business experience. The railway trust marked its 50th anniversary of operations in 2017, while the railway line has actually been in operation since 1836. It is the largest preserved heritage railway in the UK in terms of route mileage operated and passenger numbers.

The NYMR owns and operates the railway line from Pickering to Grosmont, and extends its train services from Grosmont to Whitby on the east coast over the Network Rail line. Many varieties of rolling stock are used on the line, including steam and diesel locomotives, and vintage carriages. The NYMR own and restore much of the stock, in partnership with the LNER (London and North Eastern Railway) Coach Association, which provides an umbrella organization for privately and corporately owned vehicles that are used on the NYMR. Imagine owning, restoring and operating your own full-scale railway carriage or engine!

d31-NYMR engineer cw
engineer on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway

Some images of a few doors shot during a recent visit to the NYMR are included in this post as my contribution to Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors blog for this week. The first two green doors are from similar carriages in various states of repair. The train guard – also known as the conductor or train manager – is responsible for the safety of the train.

d31-guard door 1 cw
green guard door 1
d31-guard door 2 cw
green guard door 2

This brown carriage door is from one of the restored heritage teak carriages, originally built in 1935.

d31-teak carriage cw
teak carriage door

This second pair of green doors is attached to a small building located on the station platform in Pickering. Both doors are signed “private” – one door is an electrical room – but I don’t know the purpose of the other. The purpose for the red buckets is clearly understood, although water and electricity don’t mix well.

d31-green doors cw
private doors

There are four stations located along the NYMR line between Pickering and Grosmont. Each station has been restored to reflect various periods in the history of the line. One of the train stations is at Goathland, which has been used as a set in various movies and TV programs. Viewers of “Heartbeat” will know the village of Goathland as Aidensfield. The doors of the Aidensfield Garage and Scripps Funeral Services are shown here. It now serves as a souvenir shop.

d31-aidensfield garage cw
the Aidensfield Garage

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Wheels

I selected a couple of images of old wheels to post in response to Cee’s weekly Black and White Photo Challenge for this week. These wheels belong to old carts that were the primary means of transporting commodities in their day. Presently, they are on display for public viewing at museums or antique shops, as a reminder of the past.

black-white-banner

The Cumnock Star wagon was built in the 1870’s and operated on a round trip route between Cumnock and Molong, in central New South Wales, Australia. This wagon was drawn by a team of 9 clydesdales, carrying wheat in one direction, and beer, spirits and supplies in the opposite direction. The Aussies have always needed to be well supplied!

The old cart and wheelbarrows are on display at the Weald and Downland Living Museum, located in southern England, and the subject of one of my previous blog posts.

CBWC-cumnock star cw
The Cumnock Star
CBWC-Wheels-wagon wheels b_w cw
cart and wheelbarrow wheels